Tuesday, March 18, 2008

ABC Wednesday ~~ letter "I"

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Ummm Illuminating this “I”
One Incline near the HASP Last week Hubby and I were walking about and he SPIED Ice on an inclined tree…Snap snap I go
Water draining off the farm pond
There is Indigo, as with these flowers sitting on an Iron stand with an Illuminating lamp that looks like a man with two ducks that as well illuminate.
tee hee how DUCKY
Ummmmmmmmmmm Or the Iris in this bouquet…
Shallots
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But I finally settled down for this: Something about the home that I use frequently…our Cast Iron skillets [one of several]… this weekend I will be re-seasoning them… The one that is often used in my shots of food prep, is a skillet we have had for 36 years…
Radicchio with cannellini beans
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We also have the one skillet my parents had…after re-seasoning; it still produced an excellent product… the fish for Sunday’s dinner. Recipe at the end: ~~~~~~~~
Fe (Latin: ferrum) and atomic number 26. Iron is a group 8 and period 4 element. Iron is a lustrous, silvery soft metal. It is one of the few ferromagnetic elements Cast IRON In the 1800s cast iron cookware enjoyed tremendous popularity. Bare cast iron
The Fish [Tilapia]
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Bare cast-iron vessels have been used for cooking for hundreds of years.[1] Cast iron's ability to withstand and maintain very high temperatures makes it a common choice for searing or frying, and its excellent heat diffusion and retention makes it a good option for long-cooking stews like gumbo or Chili con carne. Because cast iron skillets can develop an extremely "non-stick" surface, they are also a good choice for egg dishes, particularly scrambled eggs. Other uses of cast iron pans include making cornbread and pineapple upside-down cake. The development of bronze and iron metalworking skills allowed for cookware made from metal to be manufactured, although adoption of the new cookware was slow due to the much higher cost. After the development of metal cookware there was little new development in cookware, with the standard Medieval kitchen utilizing a cauldron and a shallow earthenware pan for most cooking tasks with a spit employed for roasting.[3][4]
By the 17th century, it was common for a western kitchen to contain a number of skillets, baking pans, a kettle, and several pots along with a variety of pot hooks, and trivets. In the American colonies, these items would commonly be produced by a local blacksmith from iron while brass or copper vessels were common in Europe and Asia. Improvements in metallurgy during the 19th and 20th centuries allowed for pots and pans from metals such as steel, stainless steel and aluminum to be economically produced.[4]
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Cast iron is basically iron that is poured into a mold to create some useful implement. Cast iron pots and pans are made in this way. Pots and cauldrons were originally made from brass because iron could not be worked until furnaces creating heat enough to melt it were invented (about 513 B.C. in China and not until 1100 A.D. or so in England). At this point, pots could be made by making molds out of sand and pouring molting metal into the mold.
The Lemon Vinaigrette
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Cast iron cookware was highly valued in the 18th century. George Washington's mother thought so much of her cookware she made special note to bequeath her cast iron in her will. In their expedition to the Louisiana territory in 1804, Lewis and Clark indicated that their cast iron Dutch oven was one of their most important pieces of equipment. Today cast iron cookware, because of its many qualities, and questions about the health effects of other metals, is experiencing resurgence in popularity. ~~
Cooking with cast iron actually adds iron to your diet, as much as 3 milligrams for every 3 ounces of food cooked. The more acidic the food you cook, the more iron is leached from the pan. Iron is critical to human health, especially that of women and infants. And, as with modern non-stick pans, you need less oil to cook food properly, reducing the use of fats, which can contribute to heart disease and other problems if used excessively.
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Sundays Dinner à la our cast iron RE-Seasoned Skillets!
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Whitefish with Lemon Vinaigrette Recipe courtesy Giada De Laurentiis Recipe SummaryDifficulty: Easy Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 20 minutes Yield: 6 servings User Rating: 8 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 3 shallots, thinly sliced 1 large head radicchio (about 12 ounces), coarsely chopped 1 (15-ounce) can cannellini beans, drained and rinsed 1/3 cup fish broth Salt and freshly ground black pepper 6 (5 to 6-ounce) whitefish fillets, such as tilapia All-purpose flour, for dredging Lemon Vinaigrette, recipe follows Heat 2 tablespoons of oil in a heavy large skillet over medium heat. Add the shallots and sauté until tender, about 2 minutes. Add the radicchio and sauté until wilted, about 5 minutes. Add the beans and broth, and cook until the beans are heated through, stirring often, about 5 minutes. Season the radicchio mixture, to taste, with salt and pepper. Meanwhile, heat 3 tablespoons of oil in a 14-inch (or 2 smaller) nonstick frying pan over medium-high heat. Sprinkle the fillets with salt and pepper. Dredge the fillets in flour to coat completely. Shake of the excess flour and fry 3 fillets in each pan until they are golden brown and just cooked through, about 3 minutes per side. Spoon the radicchio mixture over the center of the plates. Top with the fillets. Drizzle the vinaigrette over and serve immediately. Lemon Vinaigrette: 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice 1/4 cup lightly packed fresh Italian parsley leaves 2 cloves garlic 2 teaspoons finely grated lemon zest 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil Blend the lemon juice, parsley, garlic, lemon zest, salt, and pepper in a blender. With the machine running, gradually blend in the oil. Season the vinaigrette, to taste, with more salt and pepper. Yield: scant 2/3 cup Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: none
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Episode#: EI1F04Copyright © 2003 Television Food Network, G.P., All Rights Reserved
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Bon appétit!

43 comments:

ellen b. said...

Oh my goodness your I post has several yummy food items in it too! I'm having a mouth watering experience here. Love the ice shot!! You really were imaginative with your I's! Incredible...

leslie said...

This is fabulous! My mother always used a cast iron frying pan and I've been meaning to get one for years! Good post! :D

dot said...

Great post! I love cooking in cast iron especially a grilled cheese sandwich.

Autumn said...

I love all your photos and those recipes all sound yummy. I use to use cast iron skillets, but mine have become rusty over the years. The new ones you buy now just don't seem to be as good as the old ones.

Lilli & Nevada said...

Love the ice hanging great post

Neva said...

It sounds really really good! I am hoping my irises come up soon!

Katney said...

We have cast iron dutch ovens for camp cooking. (Obviously not for backpacking.)

Ida said...

What more could one wish for?! ;)
Great! Beautiful shots. The flowers, the food, the ice..... Ahhhhhh! :)

KOSTAS said...

Marvellous post, with all these the beautiful photographs, very useful the information, but also splendid the recipes!

mrsnesbitt said...

I am hungry now! Fancy a kipper! LOL!

Old Wom Tigley said...

This is very interesting.. I don't want to come over sexist.. but I know Jane will love this post. She as been wanting to back to using 'Cast Iron' cookware for a while now. I like the Stainless Steel and teflon.. but this might swing it Janes way when she reads this. We do share cooking, and baking, so you see my remarks were not sexist. I do however draw the line of wearing washing up gloves and a pinny.. unless it is frilly.. ;o0

Daryl E said...

jyInformative!

Jonna said...

I loved your photos and the cast iron article was very timely. I need to reseason mine!

Dirty Knees said...

Cast iron is the best! I have cast iron in several sizes...all picked up at garage sales, then scrubbed clean and re-seasoned. People sell them at BELOW bargain prices -- are they crazy or what? LOL

LUIZ SANTILLI JR. said...

I can't see your post!

I'm hungry!!!!

Beautiful shots and recipes!

I'm inviting you to visit my blog.

Thanks

Luiz

'JoAnn's-Digital-Eyes'NL said...

Hey Deemom, G
ood suggestions, great ABC theme, but I am afraid I am not able to cook when I am on easter hOliday ( in a Hotel) Thanks for your supposrtive reations when IOS was sick, yes animals are so much wearth in our lifes , at least mine are..

Have a good easter weekend:)

Michele (Rocky Mtn.Girl) said...

Cast iron is perfect for frying fish. I use it all the time as for many other foods.

Your Iris is pretty!

The Rocky Mountain Retreat

happyone said...

Wow that is some I post. All your pictures are great, my favorite is the ice.

Kate said...

The dripping ice photo is wonderful, and I love the brilliant colours of the flowers.

Alan said...

I might leave of the vinagrette, but I do love talapia - great fish grilled or fried - or anyway you can get it besides raw, I suppose. :)

Paulie said...

Great IDEA! I rememebr cast irobn skillets -- my Mom didn't use anything else.

John said...

Great post..yummi :-)

Dragonstar said...

This has been as good as reading a book - so much information!

I love the icicle photo.

Liz said...

Quite a collection! Yummy-looking food.

kml said...

Looks great - bet you had a fine meal!!

Andrea said...

Oh the pictures are beautiful. I love the ice one. And the food looks delicious

Kim said...

More food, I'm going to have to go make dinner now :) Great photos, I really liked the ice on the tree.

DeeMom said...

Autumn “but mine have become rusty over the years.” You can re season them there is a link in my blog for that…


AS for the ICE picture my hubby was curious if you all would like it….Glad to report he has a good eye
Katney said...DUTCH OVENS man they are awesome for sure…I have found that cooking over an open fire or an olde wood stive the cook time is just @ the same as for an indoor gas oven… Best food ever, to eat what ya catch out in the woods, like TROUT ! Oh yesssssssssssssssss

After doing some research I became aware of the resurgence of cast iron… Amazing they call that RETRO I believe ;)
ALAN my son said the same about the vinaigrette… Next time I will allow the eaters to apply it at their whim…
Dragonstar said...
This has been as good as reading a book - so much information!
Sorry Dragon I do tend to go on too much BUT next week ONLY one… letter and I promised myself to limit me

Think I can hold to that?

Thank you all for stopping by, Have a glorious Holiday

Gemma said...

What a fantastic post. Beautiful photos. I love cooking in cast iron also. The recipe looks good too.

Flassie's Fil'a said...

Oh, Thanks for stopping by and keeping my son in your prayers!

I was surprised to see that bumpersticker up on a door and especially a door of a business. It was in another town. Not one I live in. I thought it strange but took a photo of it anyway. It was in a small town. I think it was a bumpersticker anyway.

I really like your photos and the information. The food look's yummy!
It is making me hungry. Fantastic I!

Nancy said...

Loved your pictures.Thanks for sharing the history of cast iron skillets.Your food looks so delicious.

Janet said...

Cast iron skillets are wonderful! What a great choice for your I post. And all the food looks so good. I hate to cook!

kRiZ cPEc said...

Bon appétit! Thanks for sharing

AVCR8TEUR said...

I really like your icicle picture. I would try to snap one myself out of curiosity. Since I've begun seriously cooking again, thanks for some history about the cast iron pots. The photos of your meals look delicious.

Nydia said...

Oh my! I have to print this recipe. Beautiful choices for the letter I! Thanks for stoping by at my blog and for your sweet words on my little boy. Hope to see you around soon! Kisses from Nydia.

Miss_Yves said...

Lots of "I"!
I love the light of 'indigo'and "irises " !Amazing photos...
Miss Yves

Gordon said...

A comprehensive 'I' post; so great photos.

Annie said...

Your essay is fine to read and dream over - all the pretty things to see and (almost) taste. It's true, a little iron in the diet from the cast iron skillets - especially when acid foods have been cooked in them - that's a good thing.

photowannabe said...

Wow this was quite an all inclusive post. Good food and good post for I.

Kathy b said...

You found so many I's. I'm impressed!

Kathy b

VP said...

Oh now I'm very hungry! I'll need an Iron-will not to go and raid the fridge!

Lynette said...

Wow--great photos and text all the way through your ABC Wednesday post. Neat.

guild-rez said...

Wonderful posts, thank you for your comments on my blog.
Your cat's name is Canada???
Why?? Any story to tell about it??
Have a nice weekend and Happy Easter!!